Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Electrochemistry Rome, Italy.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Joachim Maier

Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Germany

Keynote: The connection between chemistry and electric function in solids

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Electrochemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joachim Maier photo
Biography:

Joachim Maier studied Chemistry at the University of Saarbrücken, received his PhD in 1982 from the same university and completed his Habilitation at the University of Tübingen in 1988. He has lectured at the University of Tübingen, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a foreign Faculty Member, at the University of Graz as a Visiting Professor, and at the University of Stuttgart as an Honorary Professor. He is Past President of the International Society of Solid State Ionics. As Director of the Physical Chemistry Department (since 1991) of the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research and Member of various national and international academies his concern is the conceptual understanding of chemical and electrochemical phenomena involving solids as well as their use in materials science. He has been listed as one of the most influential scientific minds (Thomson Reuters).

 

 

Abstract:

In loose terms chemistry is the chemistry of the perfect state (perfect crystallographic structure) plus chemistry of the excited state (defect structure). The latter is responsible for the electric transport and storage properties. In aqueous solutions this function is taken by H+ and OH- ions as well as dissolved ions. In solids this role is carried out by point defects such as excess (interstitials) and lacking particles (vacancies). It is exactly the consideration of point defect chemistry which is necessary to understand and tune ionic transport phenomena in solids hence forming the bridge between chemistry and electric function. This picture also comprises the electronic transport enabled by excess electrons and electron holes. It is shown how the charge carrier chemistry can be understood, analyzed and varied as a function of stoichiometry and doping not only in the bulk but also at interfaces. Of special interest are size effects on the electronic and ionic carrier concentrations. These defect-chemical considerations directly translate into the electric function in batteries, fuel cells and photo-electrochemical devices. This does not only hold at or near equilibrium, also the kinetic performance depend on such issues. In addition to transport-related questions, the point defects are most relevant acid-base or redox-active centers and are thus of central significance, not only for transport, but also for reaction kinetics and catalysis. A selection of applied examples such as storage modes in batteries, reaction kinetics in fuel cells or transport effect in photo-perovskites will be addressed.

 

Keynote Forum

Jelena Popovic

Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Germany

Keynote: Interfacial effects and charge carrier chemistry in lithium electrolytes

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Electrochemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jelena Popovic photo
Biography:

Jelena Popovic is a Scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany since 2011. Her academic background includes a degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2008 and a PhD in Colloid Chemistry from University of Potsdam/Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, Germany in 2011. Her scientific interests range from new materials and transport mechanisms in ionic materials to soft matter electrochemistry and sustainable synthesis of nanomaterials.

 

Abstract:

Lithium electrolytes that link high ionic conductivities with high lithium transference number are rare, and believed to be essential for functional high power batteries. One effective way to prepare such materials is by engaging an interfacial effect on an oxide surface in order to demobilize the anion in liquid/solid electrolytes. The galvanostatic polarization experiments as well as the influence of surface area, salt concentration and temperature on their outcome will be discussed in details. Furthermore, significance of interfacial effects in other ionic devices will be touched upon. Rather than just facilitating high performance materials, liquid/solid electrolytes are a fruitful playground for fundamental understanding of the electrical double layer. A model glyme on muscovite mica system is a starting point for tackling the issue of ion-ion correlations in concentrated electrolytes and its effect on the Debye lengths estimated from the surface force measurements. Finally, solid polymer lithium electrolytes can be used in bilayer graphene gating experiments. Here, the electrolyte plays a vital role in the direct measurement of the high lithium diffusion coefficient.